If you and/or a loved one is facing deportation from the United States, it’s critical that you understand your legal rights and the steps you can take to protect them. A lot is factored into choosing a deportation defense strategy, including the reason for your deportation and your status.

There are many potential reasons for deportation, including but not limited to:

  • Criminal conviction, such as a weapons charge or driving under the influence of alcohol
  • Failure to obey the terms and conditions required to maintain your status
  • Failure to advise the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of an address change
  • If you did not get married within the required time frame

Regardless of the reason for your potential deportation, it’s critical that you understand the defense strategies that are available to you. This allows you to protect your legal rights and hopefully maintain the ability to reside in the United States.

Here are some of the many deportation defense strategies to consider:

  • Seeking a cancellation or removal order
  • Seeking to adjust your status to address a specific concern
  • Filing a request for asylum

For instance, you may want to seek asylum in the United States. You may qualify for asylum if you have a credible fear of persecution or retaliation in your home country, such as that related to:

  • Political beliefs
  • Sexual orientation
  • Race
  • Religion
  • Gender

Persecution includes things such as imprisonment and physical violence, as well as oppression and psychological harm.

If you want to pursue asylum in the United States, it’s critical that you take the appropriate steps in doing so. Should you be facing the potential for deportation, you can use asylum as a defense strategy during your hearing.

Your other option is to apply for asylum through the U.S. Asylum Office. Regardless of the approach that you take, you must meet strict criteria backed up by supporting evidence.

When you choose the right deportation defense strategy, you’ll feel better about your ability to remain in the United States. Knowing what’s available and how to protect your legal rights is a must.